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What Dogs Chasing their Tails can Reveal about OCD

As if we need another reason to love our dogs! Dogs are currently helping scientists identify genetic variations that could lead to OCD in people, according to new research. The idea behind this is that human and canine versions are often similar, for example, dogs may lick their paws to the point of injury, whereas […]

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Feb 21, 2014
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Green Tea and Blueberry Supplement Improves Cognition

A supplement that is composed of blueberry and green tea was shown to modestly improve cognitive processing speed in older, cognitively healthy adults. This finding is “noteworthy” since “most often affected early on in the course of cognitive aging, and successful performance on these tasks often underlies more complex cognitive outcomes, such as memory and […]

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Feb 19, 2014
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Women with Schizophrenia Have a Higher Risk of Pregnancy and Delivery Complications

A new study, the first of its kind, published in British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, found that women with schizophrenia are twice as likely to experience preeclampsia, pre-term birth and other serious pregnancy and delivery complications, as compared to women without the condition. Researchers at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) and Women’s […]

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Feb 12, 2014
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Could Training Your Brain be the Key to Beating Depression?

A new study suggests that new brain imaging technology may help people adjust and control their brain functioning by allowing them to “watch” their own brain activity as it happens. Published in NeuroImage, the study was conducted by Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital – The Neuro, McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre. It […]

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Feb 10, 2014
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Childhood Anxiety Disorder: Long-term Follow-up

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine discovered how important long-term follow-up is when it comes to childhood anxiety. Published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, researchers from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and five other institutions found that only half of children and teens that receive treatment for anxiety actually achieve long-term […]

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Feb 05, 2014
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Parent Delivered CBT Shown to Reduce Anxiety in Kids

Five to ten percent of children have some form of anxiety disorder, which can increase problems later in life, such as mood disorders and substance use. A new study, published in British Journal of Psychiatry, found that parent delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), with the guidance of a therapist, is effective in treating child anxiety disorders. […]

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Jan 29, 2014
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Talking About Your Bipolar Disorder

Striking up a conversation about your bipolar diagnosis can be challenging and emotional, and not exactly an ice-breaker. However, being proactive about your treatment and disorder will set a positive tone, whether you are breaking the news for the first time or wanting to talk further about it. Psychiatrist Daniel Wilson, MD, chair of psychiatry […]

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Jan 24, 2014
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Under-Reporting Drug Use in Schizophrenia Patients

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Recent studies have found that individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia are less likely to report drug use, which could hinder the patient’s treatment. In one study, doctors suspected that patients with severe mental disorders were not reporting drug use accurately and this was leading to barriers in treatment. When patients underwent drug testing for cannabis, cocaine and methamphetamine, 38% tested positive for drug use. However, 58% did not report using these drugs. It was found that those most likely to conceal their drug use were older and had greater neurological deficiency.

Since this poses a problem to doctors trying to treat patients, there is one thing that can be done to alleviate this and increase the amount of reporting. It is thought that the fear of disclosure and judgment is causing individuals to hide this information. The study authors state that establishing a positive alliance between physicians and patients could improve the individual’s willingness to disclose drug use information.

 

Resources: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/818434

http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/23551851

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Jan 06, 2014
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Two Pesticides Linked to Higher Risk of Endometriosis

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Endometriosis is a common gynecological disorder that occurs in up to 10 percent of reproductive-age women. Affecting 5 million women in the United States, endometriosis is when the tissue that lines the uterus grows outside the womb, which can lead to pain and/or infertility.

So what do pesticides have to do with endometriosis? In a new study comparing 248 women newly diagnosed with endometriosis to 538 women without the condition, it was found that higher exposure to two pesticides—beta-hexachlorocycloheaxane and mirex—had a 30 percent to 70 percent higher risk of endometriosis.

The study sought to look at the role of environmental chemicals with estrogenic properties. “We found it interesting that despite organochlorine pesticides being restricted in use or banned in the U.S. for the past several decades, these chemicals were detectable in the blood samples of women in our study and were associated with increased endometriosis risk,” said study lead author, Kristen Upson.

Although the study found an associated between exposure to two specific pesticides and a higher risk of developing endometriosis, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship. Victoria Holt, principal investigator of the study, notes, “This research is important, as endometriosis is a serious condition that can adversely affect the quality of a woman’s life, yet we still do not have a clear understanding of why endometriosis develops in some women but not in others. Our study provides another piece of the puzzle.”

Resource: http://www.everydayhealth.com/womens-health/1105/two-pesticides-tied-to-higher-risk-of-gynecological-disorder.aspx

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Jan 05, 2014
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Pelvic Pain: Uterine Fibroids vs. Endometriosis

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Fibroids can cause severe menstrual pain, but so can endometriosis. What’s the difference between these two conditions? Uterine fibroids are benign lumps of muscle and connective tissue that grow on the uterine wall. Nearly one in four women over 35 is affected.

Most uterine fibroids are harmless and don’t cause symptoms. However, fibroids can cause a feeling of moderate pelvic pressure at any time. And the closer they are to the uterine lining, the heavier the menstrual flow. It may last longer than seven days and/or cause a need to change tampons every hour or two. Discomfort or pain during intercourse can also occur with uterine fibroids. Other symptoms include an irregularly shaped uterus which may put pressure on the bowel and/or bladder. This can result in difficulty with bowel movements, constipation, urinary frequency, incontinence and backaches. Reproductive problems include recurring miscarriage, infertility and labor complications.

Endometriosis is a condition where the type of tissue that lines the uterus also grows outside the uterus, usually on the ovaries, the fallopian tubes, the outer wall of the uterus, the intestines, or other organs in the abdomen. Since they are the same type of cells that usually line the uterus, they respond to estrogen and grow a little each month and sometimes slightly bleed. As this tissue is outside of the uterus, blood cannot flow out of the body and therefore can cause irritation and pain. Symptoms for endometriosis may include heavy periods, painful menstrual cramps, bloating, constipation and/or diarrhea.

This painful condition affects up to one in three women. Unfortunately it takes an average of 10 years to diagnose endometriosis after symptoms start, partly because so many women think it’s merely severe menstrual cramps.

Resource:

http://www.empowher.com/uterine-fibroids/content/pelvic-pain-uterine-fibroids-vs-endometriosis

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Jan 02, 2014
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